Alright – I’m back on track!

Besides being humid as hell today, it was a fairly productive day of work. I got a few small things done.

First, I pulled the driver front tire and adjusted the fender to bolt the lower support on. I went ahead and touched up any scuffs and places I missed painting while I had the tire off. Man, he really had a few of those nuts on TIGHT!

Then I moved over to the other side and did the same thing.

Next I checked the differentials, trans and transfer fluids – all were OK.

Then I moved on to the grease points – shackles, u joints, drive shaft slip joints, bell crank, tie rod ends, drag link, pedals and transfer shift levers. A couple of the shackles had to be loosened a little to get any grease in them (the front ones). I also had to replace one of the pedal Zerk fittings. While I was doing these, I painted a circle around them for easy lubing point ID next time. The military did this some times to speed up servicing and make it easier to identify lube points – it helps me, so why not? I also went ahead and removed the rear axle bearing Zerk fitting plug (they removed them so that they wouldn’t get damaged and wouldn’t be lubed by an operator), and fitted a temporary Zerk fitting and pumped a little grease in the wheel bearings. I know they haven’t been lubed in the past 15 years anyway!

While I was waiting on Fed Ex to show up with my drag link rebuild kit, worm shaft bearing kit and tie rod end, I decided to go ahead and install a military security system.

It is simply 2 chain links with a blot run through the chain and the dash. You put the gearshift in reverse (closest to the dash), and put a lock around the gear shift and through the chain link! It’s not fool-proof, because the chain and the lock can be cut, and the bolt can be removed. The military welded the link to the dash, but since I have gas in the tank, I opted to NOT do that! It would still take someone a while to figure out that it is bolted on and remove the bolt. Better than nothing, and I didn’t want to put a key switch on it – I wanted it to look military.

I worked a little on the brakes. I found several leaks around the end of the master cylinder. The nut securing the “Y” for the brake lines was about an 1/8 of a turn loose. I had to remove the brake light switch to tighten that. One of the brake line coming out of the “Y” was slightly loose too. While I was under there, I found another fuel fitting that was wet and tightened it up.  I filled up the master cylinder and loosened the bleeder screws at all 4 corners and let it drip. Then, Jordan tried to help me bleed them, but it didn’t go too well – still didn’t have a high pedal, but it didn’t leak anymore!

Finally Fed Ex showed up! I test fit the tie rod end, because I broke one of my commandments and bought an OMIX ADA part! It fit perfect! I put some anti seize on the threads and tightened her down . I few pumps of the grease gun and some OD paint and time for a test drive. The steering wheel play is cut in half too!

Jordan and I took a quick ride over to the field revealed that the steering was much better! I pulled into the middle of the field and tried to tune the antenna, but didn’t have any luck – I lengthened it twice and the reading didn’t change ~5. I did notice that the AMP meter was showing on the CHARGE side – it hasn’t moved in a while, so I figured it either wasn’t charging or wasn’t reading right. The TEMP got up to about 195 while idling in the field too – was still there when I got back to the house. I’ll have to watch that for the next few drives. I forgot to mention that while I was under the front end, I saw a couple of drops of antifreeze on the axle. When I started looking around, I found that the radiator was touching the bellcrank nut and might have vibrated a crack or hole in it! I fixed that problem by adding 2 washers between the radiator and grill at the mounting bolts.

The CB is pretty noisy – I don’t know whether it is the battery or the CB vibrating – probably the battery.

Tomorrows list:

  1. Figure out if the CB battery is vibrating
  2. Check the temp reading
  3. Work on the Fuel gauge
  4. Bleed brakes again
  5. Study about CB antenna tuning

 

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